Menopause Hot Flushes

Menopause hot flushes usually last for only a brief time, or just a few minutes. On the other hand, hot flashes are considered to be much more intense and bouts can last for upward to 20 minutes with 15-20 (or more) episodes per day.

Hot flashes can be common symptoms associated with menopause, perimenopause, pre menopause, and early menopause. Night sweats and sleeplessness are directly associated with hot flushes or warm flushes and the same catalyst is involved.

In all cases, hot flashes can be directly attributed to hormonal imbalances and oestrogen level depletion.

To a degree, a woman’s body temperature is controlled by hormones. When a woman’s hormones get out of whack, (due to reduced oestrogen levels) she is prone to menopause hot flushes and other menopause related symptoms.

A woman may begin to first experience hot flashes between the ages of 45 and 55 with the onset of menopause. American women on average begin menopause at age 51. Menopause has been explained as an uninterrupted time span of 12 consecutive months when a woman experiences no menstruating periods and signals the end of her child-bearing years.

This is a normal and natural event in every woman’s life and should be considered as a life-phase and not a condition. However, a woman may begin to experience symptoms (previously not experienced) with the onset of menopause for which treatments do exist.

For mild to moderate hot flushes a woman many want to opt for non-invasive homeopathic type solutions, coupled with modifications to diet and exercise as well as a fresh look at vitamins and minerals.

Research is a very import part of the equation and every woman should carefully examine the potential symptoms, catalysts and treatment plans in advance of Menopause specialist in Houston Texas and perimenopause. This so that she can make the most thoughtful decisions (best for her), in advance. Research also eases the transition period. Research also helps to assuage any unnecessary fears or “old wives tales” related to menopause.

Hot flushes and other symptoms related to menopause are a natural part of life and the aging process. While menopause itself cannot be treated, the accompanying symptoms can.

An additional help for controlling menopause hot flushes is understanding the catalysts that can trigger hot flushes. The onset of hot flushes have been linked to stress, lack of proper sleep and rest, as well as the consumption of certain foods and beverages.

If possible, it is best to avert high-stress situations. Be sure to get plenty of rest. This may mean going to bed earlier to help ensure a more restful night’s sleep. If a woman is also experience the nighttime version of menopause hot flushes (night sweats) she is best advised to wear lightweight, wicking sleepwear and to implement the use layered bedding so that she can quickly shed unwanted layers without coming fully awake to deal with the episode. If more severe nighttime bouts persist, she may want to include the use of a bedside cooling device which can aide in a quick cool-down process.

Diet and exercise also have a role in determining the length and severity of menopause hot flushes.

Changes to diet may be necessary. Caffeine laden beverages and energy type drinks should be severely limited and any form of alcoholic beverage ought to be eliminated entirely. Caffeine can also be introduced though the use of over-the-counter pain killers and by other means. These need to be closely monitored and restricted.

Certain foods can also inflame menopause hot flushes. While this causality has not been fully explored, hot flushes have been linked to sweets (especially chocolate) as well as hot and spicy foods. Though a totally bland and limiting diet is not necessarily suggested, common sense is recommended when it comes to naturally hot and/or spicy foods.

How much we eat (portion control) and when meals and snacks are taken is also important. Seconds and thirds of a meal are not recommended. This is especially true of the evening meal. Try to consume the final meal of the day prior to 6:00 PM. Attempt to avoid snacks after this, especially late-night snacks. As with everything else, we are less able to digest larger meals than we previously could manage at a younger age. Not only is the digestive system less efficient, but large undigested meals put a much larger strain on the heart, liver, and kidneys. A late, large undigested meal may in itself produce a hot flash or night sweat episode.

Exercise is a tough subject. Age compels us to slow down. However, it is actually best to increase exercise levels with the onset of menopause. Low lever weight bearing exercises (walking, not swimming), as well as low-stress weight training are best and can help to control or limit the length and severity of menopause hot flushes and night sweats.

Menopause hot flushes usually last for only a brief time, or just a few minutes. On the other hand, hot flashes are considered to be much more intense and bouts can last for upward to 20 minutes with 15-20 (or more) episodes per day. Hot flashes can be common symptoms associated with menopause, perimenopause, pre…

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